Month: March 2017

#UDtravelingscarf2017

Editor’s note: This March, scarves are connecting about 100 University of Dayton women across campus. Each woman will spend a day with the scarf before meeting  another woman and sharing the scarf with her. After this exchange, each woman will reflect on her experience with with the scarf. This post is the sixth of the series. 

scarvesMy family moved at the beginning of my eighth grade year. For that reason, I never kept in touch with any of my childhood friends. We had no social media or texting or even cell phones, so keeping in touch with people long distance took some effort. I did exchange letters with one close friend, Cynthia Solis, whose family had moved the previous year. We were pen pals for about eighteen months before the correspondence faded.

Fast-forward about fifteen years and enter Facebook. I received a friend request from Cynthia. She was now living in Denver, Colorado, and I was in Chicago, Illinois. These two girls who were close friends in Corpus Christi, Texas, had now moved two to new places. We caught up on the missed fifteen years over a couple of Facebook message exchanges and continued with our lives.

Neomi De Anda pic Cynthia and scarf
De Anda (Left) with Cynthia

One day, years later, I posted a newspaper article about a new faculty member at the University of Dayton. Cynthia quickly asked if I knew the person because she now lived in the Dayton area. I told her that not only did I know the person, but I had just returned home from an interview at the UD. She kept my secret from February until April when I could publically announce acceptance of this new position.

On July 2, 2013, Cynthia met Martin, my husband, and I at a restaurant on Alex-Bell. I had not seen her in nearly twenty years! What crazy luck that we ended up living in the same area in Ohio. We were 12 years old when we were separated by distance. It took very little time for Cynthia and I to catch-up and our families to come to know and love one another. What a blessing! Cynthia’s family is part of my Dayton family. She was one of two local people I called when Martin was out of town, and I was having a miscarriage.

A couple of weeks ago, Cynthia and her husband informed Martin and I that they are moving. While the move is extremely positive for their family, my heart broke a little. Cynthia and I snuck a lunch together alone– a very rare occurrence. The day happened to be the day I wore the scarf. So, the traveling scarf now carries our friendship and story interwoven within it and one of the last times we will spend together while both living in the Dayton area.

-Neomi De Anda

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#UDtravelingscarf2017

Editor’s note: This March, scarves are connecting about 100 University of Dayton women across campus. Each woman will spend a day with the scarf before meeting  another woman and sharing the scarf with her. After this exchange, each woman will reflect on her experience with with the scarf. This post is the fifth of the series. 

scarvesI wore the scarf on Wednesday, March 8. I selected this day because I had a midterm exam in my broadcasting class that day, and I hoped the scarf would bring me some luck, make me feel special and make the whole day more exciting.

I found it interesting that the people who commented about the scarf were all men. Not one woman commented on the scarf I was wearing. My boyfriend and the Jimmy John’s delivery worker both complimented the scarf. I did not tell either of them about the origin of the scarf and what the scarf meant. I thought it was really cool to keep it to myself, in a way to protect this sisterhood of women. Of course, it did not have to be secret. I simply wanted it to be secret for fun. I enjoyed feeling like I was connected to something larger than myself. I am always a fan of women supporting one another, which was why I was excited to participate in this event.

I enjoyed meeting two new women through this process. I loved my conversations with both women on the two different scarf exchange days. The woman who had the scarf prior to me said she met a childhood friend for lunch while she wore her scarf which made her day special. I passed the scarf onward to a first-year student. I enjoyed getting to know her and hearing her thoughts on her college experience so far. I would have loved to talk to both women longer.

It was a cool experience to meet two nice UD women, and even cooler to wear the scarf on International Women’s Day, which was March 8. Once I realized that the scarf-wearing day also fell on that celebration, I felt connected to an even larger network of women. It was a beautiful scarf with great color and design, and it added spice to my life.

-Bridget Lally

#UDtravelingscarf2017

Editor’s note: This March, scarves are connecting about 100 University of Dayton women across campus. Each woman will spend a day with the scarf before meeting  another woman and sharing the scarf with her. After this exchange, each woman will reflect on her experience with with the scarf. This post is the fourth of the series. 

scarvesThe traveling scarf came to me a day late since the woman ahead of me was out of the office on the exchange day, and was passed on to the next woman a day late because she was out sick on the exchange day. It seemed providential because my scarf day was the day of the memorial service for my director and friend, Fr. Fancois Rossier. The scarf I got this time was black and silver, which was appropriate for such a somber event.

The next day it was a blessing to exchange the scarf with Lisa Krug, who works in a different building. We had never met but she was kind enough to come over to my building to see the art exhibit of the Marian Library on its last day here, and to have lunch with me at the Jury Box. I enjoyed meeting her and gaining a new friend, all because of a scarf. Thank you and God bless you!

-Gloria Dodd

 

#UDtravelingscarf2017

Editor’s note: This March, scarves are connecting about 100 University of Dayton women across campus. Each woman will spend a day with the scarf before meeting  another woman and sharing the scarf with her. After this exchange, each woman will reflect on her experience with with the scarf. This post is the third of the series. 

scarvesBecause I was the first in my “chain” of scarf-wearers, I had the honor of choosing from among all the various scarves available this year.  Oh the pressure! Which one should I choose?  I ended up selecting the most colorful one in the bunch. Then I noticed a few snags in the one I had selected. That, instead of making me change my choice, cemented my decision.

Other women had worn this scarf before me, I now knew, and I would ensure their spirits carried on into the future.

I wore the scarf the following Monday, then met on Tuesday with the student who would carry the scarf forward from me.  We had a delightful conversation that began with who we were, why we chose to participate in the Traveling Scarf, etc., and evolved into a much richer conversation about her future.

You see, my newfound ‘sister’ is approaching her May graduation with the usual mixture of excitement and trepidation, an awareness of the expansive possibilities that lay ahead and sadness over the possibility of losing touch with dear roommates and friends. She thinks she knows her future vocation, but is open to other possibilities, too. I told her that her openness to other possibilities was both wise and practical, and shared with her a bit of my own circuitous professional journey. I have often said that if someone would have described my career to me back when I was a 22-year-old facing graduation, I would have told that person that they were crazy.  I had a plan, and because I was a planner, that would be my life.  But I was wrong, so wrong, but so fortunate.

I wish the same for my new ‘sister’ and will keep her in my thoughts and prayers in the years ahead.  She is going to lead a great life.

-Lisa Rismiller

#UDtravelingscarf2017

Editor’s note: This March, scarves are connecting about 100 University of Dayton women across campus. Each woman will spend a day with the scarf before meeting  another woman and sharing the scarf with her. After this exchange, each woman will reflect on her experience with with the scarf. This post is the second of the series. 

scarves

The word ‘hectic’ lightly describes my day with the scarf.

Due to having a lab, two work shifts, and an intramural game, I was not able to creatively incorporate the scarf into my outfit as I had hoped. So, it sat in my book bag most of the day. Whenever I opened it, I was reminded of how busy I am. It reminded me to stop and appreciate the collaborative nature of friendships and organizations here at UD.

One thing we talk about in engineering is the competitive nature of female friendships. Since females are the minority in engineering, it often feels like we are in greater competition against both our female and male counterparts. Most of us have dominant personalities and work to protect our pride. Having the scarf made me wonder how we could create better collaboration among female engineering students. At UD, we have programs like the Society of Women Engineers, but even that focuses on professional development, which involves bettering ourselves to get an edge over our peers.

There are a few opportunities to relax in these organizations, but they usually involve games or crafting. These always turn into a competition of who can win or who can make the cutest dorm decoration. Promoting friendship among female engineers is definitely something that I want to work on improving.

#UDtravelingscarf2017

Editor’s note: This March, scarves are connecting about 100 University of Dayton women across campus. Each woman will spend a day with the scarf before meeting  another woman and sharing the scarf with her. After this exchange, each woman will reflect on her experience with with the scarf. This post is the first of the series. 

scarves

I was eager to be able to participate in the Journey of the Traveling Scarf. I thought it would help me connect to women across campus, some I knew and some I did not. When I first received the scarf it was from someone who I did know through a mutual acquaintance, she knew the mother of a friend of mine in high school. She was also an alumna from my high school.

Then, when it was my turn to hand off the scarf to the next woman, I did not know her. However, once we were talking, I learned we had more things in common than I would have thought. We both have similar ideas and beliefs, and we both are passionate about the same issues.

In the end, I am happy I met both of these women. They are such great role models for a new freshman at UD, like myself.

One thing I was not expecting when I wore the scarf, however, was the confidence I felt. I really felt connected to so many women, and through that I felt less alone. Even walking to class by myself, I felt more comfortable because I knew I had so many women with me in spirit. The scarf pushed me out of my comfort zone that day, and I really had a great time. One of my teachers was also wearing the same scarf that day and we were excited to see each other in it.

This was such a wonderful experience to have had, and I am so grateful. I know it will be something I remember for a long time and I hope others have their own moving experience with the scarf.

-Jennifer Conard